Logo [Welcome to the ART ON SCREEN DATABASE tm!]
an international compilation of bibliographic information
about moving-image productions on the visual arts
© 1985-1997 by the Program for Art on Film, Inc.



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Subjects covered
Fine arts (painting, sculpture, drawing), architecture, archaeology, photography, decorative arts, design, costume, crafts, folk arts, and related topics such as aesthetics and creativity.

Media formats included
Film, video, videodisc, multimedia and CD-ROM productions.

Coverage
More than 25,000 records, representing productions from some seventy countries. The majority of these productions date from 1970 to the present, with selective coverage of earlier productions from 1915 through 1969. A related database includes names and addresses of more than 5,000 distributors and producers of moving-image productions.


FAQs about the Art on Screen Database

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Conditions of Use/Copyright/Disclaimers
Copyright 1985-1997 by the Program for Art on Film, Inc. All rights reserved.
PLEASE READ THE CONDITIONS OF USE SECTION CAREFULLY BEFORE USING THIS SITE. By using the Program for Art on Film Web site and Art on Screen Database, you signify your acceptance of these terms of use. If you do not agree to these terms and conditions, please do not use this site.



FAQs about the ART ON SCREEN DATABASE

What's in the Art on Screen Database?
The Art on Screen Database is an international compilation of bibliographic information about moving-image productions on the visual arts. Subjects covered include: fine arts (painting, sculpture, drawing), architecture, archaeology, photography, decorative arts, design, costume, crafts, folk arts, and related topics such as aesthetics and creativity. Media formats covered include film, video, videodisc, multimedia and CD-ROM productions. The database provides comprehensive coverage of English-language productions and extensive coverage of important productions from many European and other countries.

The online database includes more than 25,000 records, representing productions from some seventy countries. The majority of these productions date from 1970 to the present, with selective coverage of earlier productions from 1915 through 1969. A related database includes names and addresses of more than 5,000 distributors and producers of moving-image productions.

How did the Art on Screen Database get started?
In 1984, the Program for Art on Film was formed as a joint venture between the J. Paul Getty Trust and The Metropolitan Museum of Art. One of the first projects undertaken by the Program was the compilation of a critical inventory of existing productions about the visual arts. In order to serve the goal of encouraging new ways of thinking about the relationship between art and moving-image media, the Program's leaders thought it was important to study and assess what was already being done. The inventory would also serve as an information resource to support the effective production and use of media on the visual arts. This critical inventory has now developed into the present international database.

What is included in a database record?
Each entry contains a synopsis of the content, as well as credits, country, language, production date, format, and other data, including distribution sources. Approximately one-third of the entries also include some critical data: evaluations by panels of art and film professionals, or references to published reviews or festival awards. Detailed subject indexing allows researchers to retrieve data in a variety of ways. Entries are also classified by film genre.

Have any of the films been evaluated? Who participated?
Since 1986, the Program has convened a series of panels each comprised of two subject experts, two production experts, and two media programmers who spent a day with Program staff viewing and discussing recent releases. The published evaluations represent the combined opinions of these panels of experienced art and media professionals. To date, some 270 individuals have participated in one of our evaluation panels, and more than 600 productions have been evaluated. The panels evaluate films on the basis of the accuracy and presentation of content, production values, and programming potential. For a copy of our "Guidelines for Evaluating Films/Videos on Art," see the Resources section.

In addition to the panel evaluations, many films in the Database have been screened by staff of the Program for Art on Film and/or The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and their comments noted in a separate "Comments" field.

How are the entries indexed?
Each entry is assigned one or more Main Terms designating the art form (e.g., painting, drawing, architecture, Greek and Roman art, etc.), followed by a Qualifying Term indicating Style or Period, Material or Technique, etc. Terms, for the most part, have been drawn from the Art & Architecture Thesaurus. Extensive use has been made of "People Terms," enabling you to search for such terms as black artists, women artists, children as artists, etc. The Associated Concepts field lists such terms as "art and mathematics", "photography and war," "architecture and music," "perspective," "public art," etc. Entries are also classified by filmmaking genre, e.g., animation, fiction, instructional, profile, etc.

Who uses the Art on Screen Database?
A museum film programmer is looking for films about Goya to show in conjunction with an exhibition. An architectural historian wants to show videotapes on Italian Renaissance architecture to his class. A producer would like a list of directors and camera people who have made films about art. A librarian wants to acquire films and videos about black and Hispanic artists for her collection. A curator is looking for films about pre-Columbian art that show certain locations in Mexico. A filmmaker who is developing a project wants to know what other films have been made about Andy Warhol. A multimedia producer is looking for film footage of an architectural monument to include in a CD-ROM production. A television researcher needs footage of a recently deceased artist, shown in his studio.

These are examples of actual searches the Program for Art on Film has done for researchers.

How do we purchase/rent the titles we find in the Database?
The Program for Art on Film is not a distributor and does not rent or sell films/videos directly. To obtain prints and permission to show films, you must contact the distributors directly.

Sometimes the distributor information has changed. What can I do?
This information changes frequently. We make our best effort to keep it up-to-date but we must rely on our users--and distributors--to inform us when they find outdated distributor information. Please notify us when you find distributor changes so we can update our records. Program for Art on Film members can contact us for assistance in locating alternative sources. (E-mail: Info@Artfilm.org or Fax 718-399-4507)

How can I have my film(s) listed in the Art on Screen Database?
Send a brochure, catalogue, press kit, or other documentation to: Program for Art on Film, Inc., 200 Willoughby Avenue, c/o Pratt SILS, Brooklyn, NY 11205. Fax: 718-399-4507; Tel 718-399-4506. Or click here to fill in and E-mail a data form to us.

Need help?
If you would prefer to have Program staff do a search for you and send you a printed list of relevant productions, contact us for and research fees.

Contact: Program for Art on Film, Inc.
P.O. Box 321, Cooper Station
New York, NY 10276-0321
E-mail: Info@Artfilm.org
 
 





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